Friendship’s Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia

Katherine Philips (1655)

Katherine Philips (née Katherine Fowler) est une poète du dix-septième siècle anglais connue et célébrée sous le nom de l’Incomparable Orinde. C’est ainsi qu’elle signait les textes poétiques adressés à ses amis.


1

Come, my Lucasia, since we see
That miracles men’s faith do move,
By wonder and by prodigy
To the dull, angry world let’s prove
There’s a religion in our love.

2

For though we were designed t’agree,
that fate no liberty destroys,
But our election is as free
As angels, who with greedy choice
Are yet determined to their joys.

3

Our hearts are doubled by the loss,
Here mixture is addition grown;
We both diffuse, and both engross:
And we whose minds are so much one,
Never, yet ever are alone.

4

We court our own captivity
Than thrones more great and innocent:
‘Twere banishment to be set free,
Since we wear fetters whose intent
Not bondage is, but ornament.

5

Divided joys are tedious found,
And griefs united easier grow:
We are selves but by rebound,
And all our titles shuffled so,
Both princes, and both subjects too.

6

Our hearts are mutual victims laid,
While they (such power in friendship lies)
Are altars, priests, and off’rings made:
And each heart which thus kindly dies,
Grows deathless by the sacrifice.


Pour citer cette page

Katherine Philips, « Friendship’s Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia » (1655),  MuseMedusa, no 6, 2018, <https://archives.musemedusa.com:443/dossier_6/philips/> (Page consultée le 07 December 2022).